Posts tagged “paint

Golden: WTF? Part 2

It should be known that the folks over at Golden reached out to me and said the caps are a known issue and you can contact the company for refunds:

 

“Yes – we had an issue with the cap caused by a supplier reformulating the plastic. We have remedied that problem and offer replacements for all customers who experience this problem (generally with tubes more than a couple years old). Please, call our customer service team for assistance: 800-959-6543 or 607-847-6154.”

 

Now I’m even a bigger Golden fan. More companies can learn from them.

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Golden: WTF?

Or, as they say in my favorite syndicated comedy, What the Shit?

Apparently the plastic is weaker than the paint… Which, in some ways is a good thing, no?

golden 1

golden 2

In case you don’t get the two above pictures, that is the top part of the cap broken off, the white part on the neck of the tube is the other half. Notice the dried cylinder of paint that has resulted from the shape of the cap.

Here’s one more for you:

golden 3

Anyone want a half dried tube of Naphthol Red Medium acrylic paint?


Lesson #242: How to patch canvas (or how I spent last Monday night)

So every once in awhile, I get a little overzealous, and um… ‘damage’ a canvas. Usually in the form of a rip. Considering prestretched canvas is expensive, (especially because I don’t have the time, energy, or gumption to stretch my own) I formulated a way to repair it.

Here is my most recent victim:

ripped canvas

To patch your canvas, you will need the following (most likely you have these already):

  1. Acrylic medium
  2. Acrylic paint (I’m using black)
  3. Raw canvas
  4. A brush
  5. A palette knife
  6. Paper
  7. Several large books (or something very heavy)
  8. A drop cloth – this is optional, you can use more of the raw canvas as well.
  9. Beer (Any German pilsner or wheat will do)
  10. Bottle opener
  11. The ripped canvas

acrylic mediumacrylic paint

This is a pretty fast process, so you only need a couple minutes.

  1. Open the beer. Drink.
  2. Brush some acrylic medium on the rip of the damaged canvas. be sure to cover all edges, putting any threads that have separated from the canvas back in line. As you do this, you will notice the thickness of the medium starts to create a bond. Do this first on the back of the canvas, then the front. Smooth out any large deposits of medium that seep though on the front to maintain a smooth finish.

    medium on backmedium on front

  3. With the palette knife, place some paint on the back of the canvas. Be generous.

    paint on knifepaint on back

  4. Cut a piece of raw canvas just bigger than the area to be patched. Place this on the back of the canvas right on top of the paint.

    raw canvaspatch applied

  5. With your palette knife, place some paint on the small piece of canvas and smooth it out. You will feel the paint underneath moving a bit. This is okay, but try to keep the patch as still as possible.

    paint on patch

  6. Drink some beer.
  7. You should notice that the paint is more or less keeping things together now. If not, use more paint. You should be able to tilt the canvas now and examine the front. Carefully smooth out any large deposits that have come through the rip. Optionally, you can brush on more paint if you wish to to ‘seal’ the rip on the front. Do this fairly quickly as not to risk the integrity of the canvas recently applied to the back.

    paint bleeding throughpaint smoothed out

  8. Flip your canvas back over and place some paper on the patch (note to protect your floor with a drop cloth or some raw canvas).

    paper on patch

  9. Make sure your canvas is level and place the books or heavy object on the paper. Make sure you have significant weight on the canvas part itself and not the stretcher bars. Also make sure you aren’t tweaking the stretched canvas elsewhere with the weight. Notice my doctor’s office blue drop cloth.

    heavy object

  10. Finish your beer
  11. Go dancing at Deathguild

Let the above dry over night. Depending on temperatures and humidity, the patch should now be dry enough to pick up the canvas. Do this very carefully as some paint may have seeped through, adhering the canvas to the drop cloth, but should still be pliable as not to cause an issue. This will give you some time to examine the front of the piece and make any minor adjustments. If you do have any unsightly deposits of paint, you can smooth them out (very carefully) with your palette knife. Remember, the patch is not fully dry yet! You will see a ‘scar’, but don’t worry about perfection yet. Set it out to dry fully.

This is what the finished patch will look like. Notice the ‘scar’ detail. You can now slather on a bunch of paint to hide it, or use it as an effect in your composition. I took the picture with a flash to highlight the texture:

 finished

Good as new!


Lesson #241

Painters tape will gladly relieve you of India ink recently ‘dried’ on canvas.

 

india ink


Cute bunny rabbits

So I’m back in the studio painting cute bunny rabbits.

Open studios has come and gone, and now my studio is totally cleaned out. Totally. New drop cloths. It’s this sterile doctor office blue drop cloth now.

So as I began to put some details on Mr. Cute Bunny Rabbit no1, I started to outline this great eye detail, Just where the fur meets. Tori Amos‘s version of Slayer‘s “Raining Blood” is playing. And I flick the brush over the canvas, get more water, flick, switch brushes, paint, paint, then some more water and now some more white. No, water. Get some more wat — splash!

And that is how, my friends, you test the water capacity of the new doctor office blue drop cloth.